HOME | TACKLETOUR FORUMS  | EDITOR'S CHOICE | REVIEW ARCHIVE | ABOUT US | 

Latest ArticlesReels | Rods | Lines | Lures | Terminal Tackle | Tools | Storage | Watercraft | Apparel | Electronics | Enthusiast | Interviews | Events | Maintenance | Autopsy

Hot Articles


Complete ICAST 2017 Coverage
---------------

TackleTour Exclusive: On the Water with the New G.Loomis Conquest Rod Series

 ---------------

Ready to Combat the USDM : Evergreen International's Jack Hammer
---------------
First Look Inside the New Shimano Curado K Series Baitcasters
---------------

An Easier to Fish Schooling Bait - The PDL Rig
 


 


Rod Review


Daiwa Completes Their Suite with the Tatula Casting Rods! (continued)

- SVF 45 Bias Blank: Daiwa's proprietary blank technology featuring the same design as what a lot of the Japanese rod manufacturers are currently doing with their blanks. This involves running the graphite material within the blank at opposing angles - in this case 45 degrees - to work against twisting forces that casting blanks encounter when under load with the guides wrapped on top. This is often in addition to a base layer of traditional, vertical running fibers, but Daiwa's graphic on the Tatula rods seems to infer there is no traditional base layer beneath the Bias 45 construction.


Otherwise, the only real evidence of the rod's "Bias 45" construction is this label located just under the first guide up from the reel seat.

Whether it is the specific cross weave pattern, the actual grade of graphite, or the pressure and temperature with which the blank is pressed and baked, we've noticed all the blanks we've fished with this purported design seem to have a very torquey, high strung feeling about them - in a good way. The TAT721HFB is no exception.


Speaking of guides, each Tatula casting rod features Fuji Alconite guides with stainless steel frames.

- Fuji Alconite Guides with SS frames: These are not K-Series frames, but nevertheless, Daiwa finds a way to outfit this rod with name brand guides normally found on rods costing at least 30% more - like their very own Zillion sticks.


The reel seat on these rods is the next generation version of what's found on Daiwa's Zillion casting rods. The little flare wings serve an ergonomic purpose guiding your fingers around the blank for a very comfortable grip.

- Daiwa Custom Reel Seat: The reel seat on the TAT721HFB is similar to that found on the Zillion rods but more minimal. The wings extending out from either side to guide your fingers around the rod's blank are even thinner leaving more of the blank exposed and providing a really elegant design.


The Tatula casting rod's hook hangar is open ended and located just above the locking mechanism for the reel seat on the left side of the blank.

- Hook Keeper: Daiwa provides an open ended hook keeper on this stick located just above the machined reel seat locking mechanism and on the left side of the blank. This type of design has received a lot of criticism of late for catching slack line after a cast, but I didn't experience any of that on this rod.

Features Ratings for Daiwa Tatula TAT721HFB

Grip (1-5)
Guides (1-5)
Reel Seat (1-5)
Hook Keeper (1-5)
Rod Sleeve (1-5)
Total
Possible
Rating (= Tot/Pos * 10)
4
4
5
4
1
18
25
7.2


The only real overzealous graphic on this rod is the oversized "Daiwa" logo placed on the exposed blank portion of the split rear grip.

Design/Ergonomics: Daiwa usually sticks to the design parameters of less is more and they follow this with the design of the Tatula rods. Aside from a big "Daiwa" logo on the exposed graphite portion of the split rear grip, the TAT721HFB has a very refined look with black thread wraps and gold highlights. The split rear EVA grip has a small grip diameter and the rod's balance is about average (a little tip heavy) while its overall weight is excellent for a heavy powered rod over seven feet in length.

Design & Ergonomics Ratings for Daiwa Tatula TAT721HFB

Grip (1-5)
Colors / Graphics (1-5)
Balance (1-5)
Weight (1-5)
Total
Possible
Rating (= Tot/Pos * 10)
5
4
3
5
17
20
8.5


Daiwa's Tatula Casting rods are going to put a hurt on the older sibling Zillion series.

Application: The TAT721HFB is very much along the lines of what we'd classify a traditional heavy powered rod. Applications we'd recommend with this stick are pitching jigs and Texas rigged soft plastics along with the occasional Carolina rig and even throwing half ounce or larger buzzbaits in weeded areas. Soft bodied swimbaits and paddle tails are certainly an option as well, but this stick's primary strengths are going to be with vertical presentation, single hook applications.

Bass Rod Application Ratings for Daiwa Tatula TAT721HFB

Rip/Jerk (1-5)
Steady (1-5)
Lift & Drop (1-5)
Drag (1-5)
Twitch (1-5)
Total
Possible
Rating (= Tot/Pos * 10)
3
3
5
5
4
20
25
8.0

Ratings:

Daiwa Tatula TAT721HFB Ratings (?/10)

Construction/Quality If we didn't know better we'd say this was built in Japan 9.47
Performance Surprising to say the least 8.8
Price This stick is an excellent value! 8
Features Hi-tech blank in a low cost build 7.2
Design (Ergonomics) Comfortable if not average, tip heavy balance for a rod with this power rating 8.5
Application This is a traditional heavy powered stick 8.0

Total Score

8.33
Ratings Key: 1 = terrible : 2 = poor : 3 = lacking : 4 = sub par : 5 = mediocre : 6 = fair : 7 = good : 8 = great : 9 = excellent : 10 = unbelievable!
For More Details of the updated rating system visit our explanation here

 

Pluses and Minuses:

Plus

Minus
+ Blank performs above its retail grade - These sticks are going to be bad news for the Zillion line of rods
+ Light for a heavy powered rod  
+ Powerful - as a heavy powered stick should be  

  

Conclusion: Daiwa is no longer just about high end. With their recent introduction of the Tatula suite of rods and reels, the refining of Exceler, and even the debut of Lexa last year, Daiwa is proving they can engineer, build, and bring to market mainstream tackle to suit the needs of burgeoning enthusiasts across North America and more.


I love throwing buzzbaits on heavy powered casting rods and the TAT721HFB makes a great buzzbait stick!

As for the TAT721HFB, I can safely say I was pleasantly surprised by how well this stick performed, but also a little chagrined. With Alconite guides and performance this good for a stick in the $150 price range, I'm afraid the Tatula line of rods is going to render a quiet favorite of mine irrelevant. The Zillion sticks come with SiC guides, a Zaion reel seat, and Air Foam handles but at $80 - $100 more, one has to wonder if these Tatula casting rods are going to redefine everything Daiwa has to offer - including their vaunted Steez rods. For now, the Tatula TAT721HFB is hands down, a Best Value Award recipient here on TackleTour.

Looking for the Daiwa Tatula Rods? Try Tackle Warehouse

 

 

 

Google
  Web
  TackleTour

 

 

 
 





 

 



Copyright 2000-2017 TackleTour LLC All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy information.