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Complete list of all current ICAST 2014 coverage
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Glide Week : Riding the S-Wave!
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Abu Garcia Raises the Speed Bar with their Rocket!
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Daiwa’s Steez EX 100XS offers a Deadly Combination of Both Speed and Precision
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First look inside the new Curado I baitcaster
 


 


Lure Review


Daiwa adds branded spinnerbaits to their lineup of lures (continued)

 

Retrieving: When it comes time to hit the water the DS has a number of applications covered. If the water is slightly murky or you are fishing at night where there is reduced visibility you will want to use a Colorado and Indiana combination. This will slow down your bait as well as give off more vibration. Daiwa’s appropriately named “Midnight” DS is perfect for night fishing, and the titanium colored blades look fantastic and are a welcome alternative to the common black blades found on many baits. 
 


The skirt is held in place with a wire loop

 

However if you are not fishing at night, and find yourself in extremely murky or even muddy water I found the lighter colored DS lures with a gold blade would perform better. The white skirt combined with the gold blades give off the necessary flash to attract fish when visibility is low.

 


The DS features a welded loop that holds the ball bearing swivel

 

The DS features a very realistic head but what gets the fish is the action. Imparting action on the DS is done strategically. While you can catch fish by simply mindlessly casting and retrieving you will catch many more if you plan your attack based on the conditions and location. There are a number of techniques that we found the DS performed exceptionally in.    

 


No matter what the pattern every DS is armed with a red Mustad hook

 

The first of these techniques was slow rolling, a simple presentation in which we cast the DS towards shore or structure and count down or allow the DS to actually sink to the bottom. We would then retrieve the bait slowly so that it would remain in contact with as much structure as possible. We went slow with this technique, and never paused, instead dragging the bait through rocks and submerged trees. .

 


Casting the DS

   

Sometimes right after the lure bumped up against an object it would almost immediately be taken. Sometimes we mistook structure for bites, and would set into them, but sets are free so it is always better to be safe than sorry

 


Each blade is pressed with the Daiwa logo

Another technique that is well suited for the DS is jigging. While this is not a technique I often exercise, JIP has great success pulling fish out of weed patches and trees by simply tossing the spinnerbait into holes in between vegetation or the branches of a submerged tree. Part of my problem is I can’t seem to let the spinnerbait fall all the way to the bottom. During our tests JIP demonstrated the technique with success.


The "Midnight" pattern is great for night fishing

 

With the DS White Shad pattern tied on he lob casts or even pitches the spinnerbait into holes and patiently allows the spinnerbait to sink. The DS has large enough blades that it does flutter down a bit as it descends. If the DS isn’t hit on the way down JIP then lifts the tip of the rod slowly and then dip the tip allowing the line to go slack. He would repeat this up to five times, and sure enough when I thought he was wasting his time he would get a hit. A quality hook is important as you only have a split second to set the hook, and you need to pin the fish in well to successfully drag it through structure.

 


The DS can be fished many different ways

 

Next Section: Durability and Ratings 


 

 

 

 

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