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Complete list of all current ICAST 2014 coverage
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Glide Week : Riding the S-Wave!
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Abu Garcia Raises the Speed Bar with their Rocket!
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Daiwa’s Steez EX 100XS offers a Deadly Combination of Both Speed and Precision
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First look inside the new Curado I baitcaster
 


 

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Enthusiast Tackle : Rod Review


There Can Only Be One, The 2006 TackleTour SuperCast Shootout (continued) : Casting
 

Casting and Pitching: ... well, almost. Before actually hitting the water with our four enthusiast-rigs, we took to the parking lot at TT Headquarters for some head to head casting comparisons so that we could better understand what each rod had to offer when it comes to casting and pitching. We should restate, that each rod was outfitted with a limited edition, 2004 Daiwa TD-Z Custom reel spooled with 14lb Sunline Shooter Fluorocarbon. This is significant because the test plugs we employed during our casting tests ranged from a quarter to three-quarters of an ounce. Normally, on a rod test, we'd test a wider range of lure weights, but with such heavy line, anything lighter than a quarter of an ounce becomes pointless.

 

Our four contenders

 

Overhead Casting: We matched each rod up with identical casting plugs ranging in weight from one quarter to three quarters of an ounce and had at it. None of these four rods felt very good casting our 1/4 ounce test plug in an overhead presentation. With the line we were using, each rod seem to hit their stride at weights at or above three-eighths of an ounce. Interestingly enough, both the Megabass and Evergreen rods seem to load too easily during these tests and took the most practice before effective overhead casts could be made. Having said that, the two rods we enjoyed casting the most were the Megabass and Palms. Once we grew accustomed to its action, the Megabass rod actually felt very good. After our casting tests, I really do believe the statement from our contact at Nories explaining how they moved way from titanium framed guides because the flexibility in the guide's frames affected casting accuracy. The Nories was very precise, but ultimately came in third. It may have edged the Megabass were it not for its slightly cumbersome heft in comparison to the other rods. Sadly, the Evergreen came in last for being a little too whippy by comparison.

 

Pull the rod out from within its sleeve a bit more and discover the Elseil's very attractive, carbon weave butt wrap

 

Careful detailing on our Megabass Elseil includes this vertically oriented label that reminds you of this rod's origins

 

Sidearm Roll: With this style of cast, each of our four test rods were able to handle baits down to a quarter of an ounce with relative ease. While the finishing order stays the same, the Palms separated itself a little more from the Megabass simply from the ease by which it was to roll cast this rod given its shorter length, overall light weight and balance.

 

Our Evergreen Steed sports a hypalon grip butt section

 

Evergreen makes use of visible counterweights to balance out their rods only these weights are not removable so fine tune adjustments are out of the question

 

Pitching: To our dismay, none of the rods tested were really able to handle pitching our quarter ounce test plugs very well. Granted, the heavier line we were using did not help matters. It's always important to match your rod, reel AND line to your intended baits and techniques. We're confident that each of these rods could easily handle baits down to 1/4 ounce if matched with a reel spooled with lighter line. A Daiwa Pixy would be awesome on any of these sticks. As such, we had to step up to a three-eighths ounce casting plug to gain any pitching performance out of our rigs. Once again, the Palms Edge Pride outshined its competitors with impressive pitching performance.

 

We were a little disheartened to find the basic, no frills Fuji weight balancing kit at the end of our Nories HB680M. While we welcome the system, we were hoping for a more custom implementation.

 

A close-up of Fuji's counterweight balancing system featured on our Nories HB680M

 

Accuracy: The early difficulty we experienced casting both the Megabass and Evergreen rods overhand, re-manifest itself during our accuracy tests. Both of these sticks, it would seem, are slightly more moderate than the Palms and Nories rods and as such, required a slight adjustment in technique to gain accuracy in our casting exercises. Pitching accuracy was not an issue with any of the rods. The rod that was easiest and most accurate to cast, off the deck, was the Palms Edge Pride. Another victory for this very understated stick.

 

Featuring a full rear grip of cork, the next detail item to catch our attention with the Palms Edge Pride was the actual reel seat

 

Stamped with parent company's name, Angler's Republic, the reel seat of our EPGC 664 has quite an attractive pattern.

 

Weight Range: We conducted each of the above casting techniques with a variety of weights. As we stated earlier, we're confident in each of the rods' abilities to match their low end lure ratings at one quarter ounce. This includes the Nories HB680M which is actually rated down to three-eighths rather than a quarter ounce. On the high end of three quarters of an ounce, all but the Nories HB680M began to feel slightly overloaded. Not surprisingly, based on the rod's performance on our RoD WRACK, our Evergreen Steed faired the worse in these trials and is probably best suited with baits up to five-eighths of an ounce rather than its stated rating of up to three-quarters.

 

Casting Test Rankings

Megabass
Evergreen
Nories
Palms
Overhead Casting
2
4
3
1
Sidearm/Roll Casts
2
4
3
1
Pitching
2
4
3
1
Accuracy
3
4
2
1
Ability to handle a wide variety of lure weights
3

(1/4-3/4 oz)

4

(1/4-5/8 oz)

1

(1/4-3/4+ oz)

2

(1/4-3/4 oz)

Average Ranking
2.4
4
2.4
1.2

 

Casting Final Thoughts: The table above summarizes the rankings for these particular tests and averages the overall rank for this category. As such, it's clear the early lead goes to our Palms Edge Pride EPGC 664. We will be summarizing each of our tests with a similar table at the end of each section. Tables and rankings aside, the EPGC 664 was easily our most fun rod to cast and pitch.

   

Next Section: Sensitivity and Power 


 

 

 

 

 

 
 





 

 



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