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Tool/Accessory Review


Get a “Trigger Happy” Grip on your Casting and Spinning Rigs (continued)

On the original version I could feel the area where the grip ended and the trigger begins. This transition is now more seamless with the new casting version as the grip connects directly to the ring portion. The ring not only keeps the grip in place and I found it delivered additional comfort when I was working reaction baits with like ripbaits and especially when I was tossing swimbaits all day. The heavier the bait or more aggressive the action the more the THCG benefits come into play.


Placing the THCG over a Jackall rod for fishing ripbaits

In addition to providing a soft trigger surface the THCG offers the added benefit of increased grip on the rod itself with the ribbed version. It also provides a nice comfortable leverage point when setting into fish and muscling them towards the boat.


A look at the ribbed grip

Next we turn our attention to the new Trigger Happy Comfort Spinning Grips (THCSG). These grips look nothing like a fingertip, and instead resemble a rubber screw. Unlike the casting versions which go on the trigger of your rod, the spinning version is designed to provide a layer of insulation on the support arm of your spinning reel.


The spinning THCG is designed to fit over the reel support arm versus the rod's reel seat

Installation on the spinning grip is nowhere close to as easy as the casting versions. First you need to slide the smaller end onto the front of the reel foot then push it to the support arm junction, this part is easy. Then you need to pull the back edge of the grip all the way over the rear reel foot. Trying to do this by hand is very difficult, and the best way to stretch it over is with the extra leverage of a screwdriver.


Here we use a Okuma Helios as our test reel

By propping one side of the screwdriver over the rear reel foot you can gain enough leverage to pull the grip over and it will snap into place on the neck of the reel. With reels up to 2500 size this can be done with a normal screwdriver, just be careful not to scratch your reel. If your screwdriver, or leverage object, is too sharp it is also possible to cut into the grip itself and rip it open. We found it safer to use electric tape to wrap the sharp edges as a precaution, and the company also bundles a bit of plastic tubing that will fit some screwdrivers and also help minimize the chance of cutting into the grip. With extra-large reels a larger and longer screwdriver is required and you really have to put some muscle behind trying to stretch the grip over the foot. Even with all the precautions we still managed to rip one of our test grips on a 4000 size reel by applying too much pressure.


To install slip the grip over the front of the front of the reel foot

Once the spinning grip is installed it is tight enough, even on small reels, to stay in place and not work its way down the support arm. Like the casting versions it provides a comfortable grip, especially when fishing reaction baits or when working fish. We did find this grip a little more polarizing than the casting version. Some of our editors, myself included, never really got used to the extra gap area that it creates on the support arm. While the surface is comfortable enough it just never felt completely ergonomically natural to me.


A screwdriver is necessary in most cases to provide extra leverage to stretch the grip over the back of the reel foot

Also depending on what outfit you are fishing the support arm of the reel is not necessarily the main pain point. I felt a lot of pressure was coming from the reel seat and the actual foot of the reel directly onto my index finger, especially when working hardbaits or actively working a shakey head worm for extended periods.


The grip provides extra cushion and a nice grip surface but a number of us felt it also added bulk, feeling wide and somewhat unnatural

Next Section: Feeling a little Trigger Happy

 

 

 

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